Trade Me user seeking $4000 for Paul McCartney tickets says he's just making a point

A TradeMe user is trying to sell a pair of $150 tickets to Paul McCartney's Auckland concert in December for up to $4000.
TRADE ME

A TradeMe user is trying to sell a pair of $150 tickets to Paul McCartney's Auckland concert in December for up to $4000.

If you can't beat them, join them: a Trade Me user who says he's fed up with companies sanctioning ticket resales at inflated prices has listed a brazen bid to cash in on Paul McCartney tickets.

The Wellington-based user advertised the two tickets for McCartney's Auckland concert in December, for which he says he paid $150 each, for a "buy now" price of $4000, and starting bid of $1500.

The man, who did not want to be named, said he was frequently priced out of the market by ticket resale websites, and decided it was time to join the open market.

Paul McCartney performing in Madrid last year. He will play Auckland's Mt Smart Stadium on December 16.
CARLOS ALVAREZ/REDFERNS

Paul McCartney performing in Madrid last year. He will play Auckland's Mt Smart Stadium on December 16.

"I am simply taking advantage of a system that can be policed, that isn't.

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"I have been going to concerts my entire life and it has now got to the point where the only way I can get tickets ... is to take a punt on high-demand concerts, resell the tickets, and then pay the increased prices from sites such as Trade Me, Ticketmaster Resale or Viagogo."

Those sites facilitate the buying and reselling of event tickets at inflated prices, giving people who missed out a second chance if they are willing to pay market value.

The man said he recently missed out on tickets to see Queens of the Stone Age in Auckland next month. Shortly afterwards, he checked the resale value on Viagogo of nine British and Irish Lions rugby tickets he had bought, and discovered they would have sold for about $850 each.

"This would have given me and my partner enough to fly to Japan, see Queens of the Stone Age [in Nagano], and spend five nights in a four-star hotel."

Those were the days: The Beatles on the balcony of the St George Hotel, on the corner of Boulcott and Willis streets in ...
ALEXANDER TURNBULL LIBRARY

Those were the days: The Beatles on the balcony of the St George Hotel, on the corner of Boulcott and Willis streets in Wellington in 1964. McCartney is second from the left.

In the listing, the user, iamthe42, boldly stated he had bought the tickets for McCartney's December 16 show at Auckland's Mt Smart Stadium purely to make some money – and a lot of it.

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"So here's the deal ... I have 2 tickets for the upcoming Paul McCartney concert in Auckland that I want to make as much money as possible from," his post said.

When alerted to the listing, Trade Me promptly removed it – not because of the exorbitant markup, but because the seller does not actually have the tickets in his possession.

Pre-sale tickets for the former Beatle's Australasian tour went online on his website on Tuesday, but will not be accessible to buyers until September.

"This seller is welcome to try their luck again when they've bought a physical ticket for the gig," spokesman Logan Mudge said.

Several users expressed outrage at the blatant scalping attempt, to which some forthright responses were offered.

To one person who told him to enjoy the concert, the seller replied: "Oh, I am not going. I don't even know who Paul Cartney [sic] is, but I have been told that he is very popular and his tickets will sell out, so I though [sic] I would make some easy cash.

"I will however be booking a week in Fiji once I sell them. I am looking forward to that."

Mudge said people were welcome to onsell event tickets at whatever price they wanted, as long as they had the physical tickets and the event was not protected by the Major Events Management Act, which covers events such as the Rugby World Cup and the current British and Irish Lions tour.

 - Stuff

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