Nearly half the country's mayors join call for compulsory charge on plastic bags

Nearly half of New Zealand mayors have now signed an open letter to  Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson, ...
MAARTEN HOLL/STUFF

Nearly half of New Zealand mayors have now signed an open letter to Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson, calling for a plastic bag levy.

Nearly half of the nation's mayors have signed a letter putting pressure on central government to impose a mandatory charge on plastic bags, but the call seems to be falling on deaf ears.

Two weeks after the mayors of Wellington, Auckland and Dunedin circulated an open letter calling for local government to support a levy, the number of signatories have grown to include 28 of the country's 67 mayors, including Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel.

Meanwhile, a petition launched by a group of Wellington high school students calling for a levy has gained over 8900 signatures.

A group of Samuel Marsden students are taking the plastic bags fight to Nick Smith. Clockwise from top right, Cici ...
MAARTEN HOLL/FAIRFAX NZ

A group of Samuel Marsden students are taking the plastic bags fight to Nick Smith. Clockwise from top right, Cici Davie, Lauren Benseman, Maggie Dai, Bella O'Meeghan, and Imogen Skelton.

Marsden Collegiate School student Cici Davie said the group was now launching a campaign, #Bagsinthewild, in which participants took photographs of plastic bag litter and emailed them to Environment Minister Nick Smith.

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"We are hoping to kind of create an influx of emails to him, so that he gets a bit overwhelmed," she said.

MAARTEN HOLL/FAIRFAX NZ

Some Kiwis are pushing for a complete ban on plastic supermarket bags.

Davie said the group was inspired by two Balinese sisters whose campaigning convinced the island's government to ban plastic bags by 2018.

In addition to these new calls, two independent surveys have shown Kiwis strongly supported a mandatory levy on single-use plastic bags.

But Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson has maintained his stance against a legislative approach.

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester had previously pressed central government to impose a levy, or step aside and allow local authorities to do so, but the spokesman said the minister was still apposed to this.

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"He thinks that would just lead to a confused situation that would be uncertain and complicated. His preference would be for a voluntary nationwide process rather than heavy-handed regulation."

The spokesman said Simpson was setting up a working group to explore options for reduing plastic bag consumption.

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester started pressing for a plastic bag levy after it was revealed Wellingtonian ratepayers ...
ROBERT KITCHIN/STUFF

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester started pressing for a plastic bag levy after it was revealed Wellingtonian ratepayers were forking out thousand just to stop plastic bags blowing out of landfill.

The Ministry for the Environment recently came under criticism for its reliance on the Packaging Forum - an industry advocacy body - to conduct research that was then used to inform policy decisions.

During an interview conducted in the wake of the criticism, Simpson said it was not unusual to use research from the sector to inform decisions.

The ministry had recently commissioned its first piece of independent research in the area, he said.

Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson was in the job for less than a week before he was handed the issue of ...
SUPPLIED

Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson was in the job for less than a week before he was handed the issue of single-use plastic bags by Minister Nick Smith.

Industry-led recycling schemes have failed to stem the tide of plastic bags entering landfill. Recent figures show the Soft Plastic Packaging Recycling Scheme collected only two per cent of the 1.6 billion plastic bags coming into the country every year.

The open letter said more action was needed, and pointed to England where a levy reduced plastic bag usage by 85 per cent within 6 months.

Lester said he was thrilled with the support shown from other leaders around the country.

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel said she would have been one of the first to sign the open letter calling for a ...
GEORGE HEARD/FAIRFAX NZ

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel said she would have been one of the first to sign the open letter calling for a plastic bag levy, but was abroad when it was launched.

Those who had not still had a few weeks before the letter was presented to Simpson.

"We've had backing from big cities and small towns. All around the country, people see the damage to the environment done by plastic bags and they want to see a change," Lester said.

"This shows the Government that there's big support for a levy and that the support is growing. This is a small change that can make a big difference."

MAYORS WHO SUPPORT A PLASTIC BAG LEVY

Neil Holdom - New Plymouth
Wayne Guppy - Upper Hutt
Grant Smith - Palmerston North
Steve Chadwick - Rotorua District
Rachel Reese - Nelson
John Carter - Far North District
David Ayers - Waimakariri District
Sam Broughton - Selwyn District
Sheryl Mai - Whangarei District
Lyn Patterson - Masterton District
Dave Cull - Dunedin
Lawrence Yule- Hastings District
Phil Goff - Auckland
Justin Lester - Wellington
Jim Boult - Queenstown Lakes District
Meng Foon - Gisborne District
Alex Walker - Central Hawke's Bay
Helen Worboys - Manawatu District
Michael Feyen - Horowhenua District
Greg Gent - Kaipara District
Andy Watson - Rangitikei District
Craig Little - Wairoa District
Bryan Cadogan - Clutha District
John Booth - Carterton
Lianne Dalziel - Christchurch
Garry Howard - Buller District
Ray Wallace - Lower Hutt
Tim Shadbolt - Invercargill

 - Stuff

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