No-Waste Nomads bring The Rubbish Trip to Manawatu

No-Waste Nomads Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince on The Rubbish Trip - Living Without A Rubbish Bin, at Massey University.
DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

No-Waste Nomads Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince on The Rubbish Trip - Living Without A Rubbish Bin, at Massey University.

Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince are travelling the country, talking trash.

The pair, known as the No-Waste Nomads, plan to spend the next year travelling the country spreading the no-waste lifestyle message, beginning The Rubbish Trip tour at Massey University in Palmerston North on Wednesday.

Brought up in Palmerston North, Prince spent the first 19 years of his life in the city, attending Awatapu College before heading to Wellington to study jazz drumming.

No-Waste Nomads Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince on The Rubbish Trip - Living Without A Rubbish Bin, at Massey University.
DAVID UNWIN/FAIRFAX NZ

No-Waste Nomads Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince on The Rubbish Trip - Living Without A Rubbish Bin, at Massey University.

The pair got together there, before spending time overseas and returning to New Zealand with the idea of "cutting out the crap".

READ MORE: Zero waste 'not so hard' for couple spreading the message

Two-and-a-half years ago, Blumhardt said she had an epiphany about living waste-free, googled it, and found out about others, singling out Lauren Singer, Bea Johnson, Matthew Luxon and Waverley Warth who were already successfully living that kind of lifestyle.

"We came back with the idea of having a fresh start and living plastic-free. After two weeks, we had started learning about problems [that waste causes] and decided to go zero waste."

According to World Bank figures, in 2012, the world produced 1.3 billion tonnes of trash. The yearly volume was expected to increase to about 2.2 billion tonnes by 2025, with peak waste expected in 2100.

By then, the world will have choked on its own refuse, with calamitous consequences for life on earth.

Prince said they lived by a version of the 5-Rs of sustainability - Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Rot.

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Recycling, touted as an "answer" to the world's rubbish woes was in their version, the second-to-last resort.

In their presentation, the pair pointed out that consumption and the disposal of the things we consume, has been normalised, and that's why "refusal" was the first step.

"You need to start off by asking 'do I really need this thing in my life?'. Nine times out of 10, the answer is 'no'," Prince said.

Some things in our possession for all of 20 minutes, such as packaging, took a lot of resources to make, and would be around for a long time after its momentary use.

"Zero waste is a lot broader than just not throwing things away," Blumhardt said.

During How To Live Without A Rubbish Bin, they quickly outlined a number of sustainable life-hacks that not only reduced waste, but would save households money.

"You don't have to deal with every issue all at once, just as they come along," Blumhardt said.

The two No-Waste Nomads will deliver a free presentation in City Library at 6pm Thursday and in the Feilding Library next Wednesday, with a school holiday zero waste arts and crafts workshop in City Library on Tuesday morning.

 - Stuff

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