Wirihana twins push each other to victory at strong man and woman competition

Manawatū strongest woman winner Shayna Wirihana, right, cheers her brother and men's winner Eruera, left, on while watched by organiser Carl Waitoa.
WARWICK SMITH/STUFF
Manawatū strongest woman winner Shayna Wirihana, right, cheers her brother and men's winner Eruera, left, on while watched by organiser Carl Waitoa.

Sibling support pushed on the winners of the Manawatū strongest man and woman competition.

Twins Eruera and Shayna Wirihana, 25, won the men's and women's competitions respectively in The Square on Saturday. Callum McConachy won the under-105 kilogram competition.

All the competitors wowed the crowd with amazing feats of strength but it was the Wirihana siblings who were the strongest for the second year in a row.

Shayna, who works at FMG, was tired but said she competed well.

READ MORE: The hunt is on to find Manawatū's strongest man and woman

"All the competitors put their heart out on the line, myself included. But my No 1 motivation was my brother, Eruera."

The siblings train together every week.

Eruera Wirihana lifts 120kg above his head during the Manawatū strongest man and woman competition.
WARWICK SMITH/STUFF
Eruera Wirihana lifts 120kg above his head during the Manawatū strongest man and woman competition.

"Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday we go to mum and dad's, me and my brother, and train together in the shed in the backyard."

Her favourite event was pulling a two-tonne ute and a trailer.

Eruera, a scaffolder, was tired after the Conan wheel event, where competitors have to lift a heavy arm attached to a wheel and carry it in a circle for as long as they can.

He said the other events weren't as hard because he does them more regularly.

Having his sister there pushed him along.

"We just train at home, we've got all the gear there and we always motivate each other to get our lifts in."

Eruera's next events are the Wellington and Canterbury strong man events, which he hoped to win.

Shayna said entering the competition was a last-minute decision because she is headed to Florida in the United States in two weeks for the World Strong Woman competition.

The other Manawatū events were flipping earth-mover tyres, which weighed 350kg for the men and 250kg for the women, and a frame carry, where competitors had to carry a heavy frame 30 metres. The women's frame weighed 160kg and the men's 240kg.

Competitors also had to lift three implements over their head. The three implements for the men were an 80kg log, 100kg axle and 120kg log. The women's implements were a 50kg log, 60kg axel and 70kg log.

Gabrielle Wichman​ was second in the women's competition and Hinewai Pouwhare-Anderson was third.

Doug Juszczyk was second in the men's grade and Jono Macfarlane was third.

In the men's under-105kg competition, Stephen Burnell was second and Ned Wright third.

Stuff