Proposed traffic and parking bylaw could fine Rangitikei motorists

Chief executive Ross McNeil says the council won't employ parking wardens.
ZARYD WILSON/STUFF

Chief executive Ross McNeil says the council won't employ parking wardens.

Authorities in Rangitikei are seeking new powers to fine motorists for parking offences.

The Rangitikei District Council bylaw would provide the council with the scope to issue infringement notices for minor offences to the tune of $150, a power it didn't previously have. 

Council chief executive Ross McNeil said the council wouldn't employ parking wardens or go out searching for transgressions, but would respond to complaints. 

Submissions will close on September 8 for a bylaw enabling the Rangitikei District Council to issue infringement notices ...
ZARYD WILSON/STUFF

Submissions will close on September 8 for a bylaw enabling the Rangitikei District Council to issue infringement notices for parking offences.

Submissions on the proposed bylaw close on September 8, with a hearing set down for September 28. 

McNeil said fines would be issued for offences such as staying over a parking time limit, parking in a disabled park or loading zone and parking in an unsafe location. 

It would also target unwarranted and unregistered cars.

"We already have staff with enforcement powers, so I expect those staff will respond primarily to complaints," he said. 

"However, if staff see a significant issue or situation that warrants action then I'd expect them to follow up on it rather than waiting for a complaint." 

Although, following up didn't mean issuing an infringement notice straight away, he said. 

"We'll continue to focus on getting people to comply once advised of a bylaw breach, but we won't sit back and take no action where we encounter repeat offenders." 

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The bylaw will be applied district-wide and involves state highways within urban areas, such as Bulls and Taihape. However, McNeil said the initial focus would be on advertised parking spaces. 

The council's draft report stated it was looking to introduce the bylaw to combat vehicle owners who  did not respond to its requests. 

The bylaw also contains a provision to allow the council to restrict heavy vehicle use and allow it only if compensation for damage to the road is paid. 

Those provisions were expected to become increasingly important as forestry throughout the district required harvesting. The report said heavy vehicles from forestry blocks caused extensive damage to low-volume, rural roads. 

The bylaw applies to all roads within the Rangitikei District Council catchment area. 

Depending on the nature of the submissions, McNeil expected a decision in late October. If the bylaw was adopted it wouldn't come into force for "several weeks". 

 - Stuff

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