It's official: a Porsche is a better investment than a house

With a number of new excitingly expensive hypercars being revealed at the recent Geneva motor show, you would have to wonder if they are really worth the incredible sums of money being asked for them.

But it seems they most certainly are.

London-based JBR Capital, specialists in high-end vehicle finance, took a look at the cars released at the Geneva show over the last decade and has revealed the top 10 cars that have appreciated in value or held their worth after launching.

The wild looking Lamborghini Veneno led the appreciators, almost tripling in value since its 2013 debut at Geneva.
Supplied
The wild looking Lamborghini Veneno led the appreciators, almost tripling in value since its 2013 debut at Geneva.

The Lamborghini Veneno, unveiled at the show in 2013, tops the charts, with the ultra-limited edition supercar appreciating in value by remarkable 180 per cent. With a launch price tag of NZ$5 million, only five coupes were ever made (nine roadsters were produced in 2014, but didn't debut at Geneva) and they are now estimated to be worth in excess of $14 million each.

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Like its fellow Italian special edition, the Ferrari LaFerrari that also debuted at the 2013 show has also put in some healthy appreciation, rising from its original asking price of $2.2 million to an estimated $4.6 million value today, and increase of 109 per cent.

The might LaFerrari has more than doubled its value since its debut. Might have to take the price of a new set of tyres off this one though.
Supplied
The might LaFerrari has more than doubled its value since its debut. Might have to take the price of a new set of tyres off this one though.

The mighty Koenigsegg One:1 that made its debut a year later and sold for $3.8 million has doubled its value in five years, while the Pagani Zonda Cinque that made its first appearance at Geneva in 2009 has risen 54 per cent in value to now be worth $3.8 million, compared to its original asking price of $2.5 million.

The 2010 Koenigsegg Agera has risen by 49 percent (from $1.7 million to $2.5 million), while the McLaren P1 (+27 per cent) and Pagani Huayra BC (+5 per cent) also made the top 10.

But the most impressive entrants were two Porsches and a Ferrari - not by virtue of their dramatic increase in value, but by the fact that they weren't actually ultra-limited hypercars with incredibly high price tags to begin with.

The Porsche Cayman GT4 is one of the few non-limited edition hypercars to increase in value since its Geneva debut.
DAVID LINKLATER/FAIRFAX NZ
The Porsche Cayman GT4 is one of the few non-limited edition hypercars to increase in value since its Geneva debut.

The comparatively modest 2017 Ferrari 812 Superfast that debuted for $495,000 has appreciated an impressive 46 per cent to now be worth $724,000, while the 2013 Porsche 911 GT3 has held its value to be worth the same it was when new - £110,000 or NZ$209,000.

Perhaps most impressive was the fact that the Porsche Cayman GT4 that made its debut at Geneva in 2015 and sold for £65,000 (NZ$124,000) is now worth £85,000 (NZ$162,000), appreciating 31 per cent in four years.

If you were faced with the choice of buying a GT4 or a £142,000 (NZ$240,000) Honda NSX that same year (although that is unlikely, given the price difference) and went for the Honda, you will be massively disappointed, as the NSX has depreciated by 22 per cent in the same time, to now be worth "just" £110,000 (NZ$209,000).

Great looking, but a bad investment - the Maserati Quattroporte has depreciated even more than an 'ordinary' car.
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Great looking, but a bad investment - the Maserati Quattroporte has depreciated even more than an 'ordinary' car.

But the NSX wasn't the worst Geneva debutant for depreciation however - that dubious honour belongs to the £110,000 2013 Maserati Quattroporte that plummeted a massive (but let's be honest, not unexpected) 71 per cent, while the £163,000 (NZ$310,000) Bentley Continental Supersports from 2009 dropped 54 per cent to £75,000 (NZ$143,000).

The 2011 Aston Martin V8 Vantage S (-45 per cent), 2014 McLaren 650S (-37 per cent), 2016 Jaguar F-Type SVR (-32 per cent), 2015 Honda NSX (-22 per cent),  2014 Rolls-Royce Ghost (-18 per cent), 2012 Ferrari F12 Berlinetta (-17 per cent) and 2018 Aston Martin DB11 Volante (-12 per cent) rounded out the biggest losers list.

It must be noted, however, that while they are the biggest depreciators that debuted at the Geneva show in the past decade, they are all largely ahead of the depreciation curve compared to more run-of-the-mill cars, which usually suffer around 50 per cent depreciation in the first three to five years.

The Bugatti La Voiture Noire is likely to appreciate significantly since its debut at this year's show. But then they did only make one of them.
Supplied
The Bugatti La Voiture Noire is likely to appreciate significantly since its debut at this year's show. But then they did only make one of them.

Surprisingly the 2016 Bugatti Chiron dropped 12 per cent from £2.5 million down to £2.2 million, meaning that French hypercar wasn't as wise an investment investment as its Italian and Swedish counterparts. So far, at least - you do have do take into account how long each of them has been on sale.

"It's unsurprising that the Lamborghini Veneno, Ferrari LaFerrari and Koenigsegg One:1 have stolen the limelight in terms of current values," said Stephen Halstead, Chief Operating Officer at JBR Capital.

"Only 499 of the Ferrari LaFerrari hybrid hypercars were produced, with buyers back in 2013 having more than doubled their money invested in this incredible vehicle. 

"We think the ones to watch from this year's Geneva Motor Show, will be the Bugatti La Voiture Noire, Pagani Huayra BC Roadster, Pininfarina Battista, Lamborghini Aventador SVJ Roadster and Ferrari F8 Tributo."

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