An all-electric Mustang is coming out to play

While pretty much everything at the Goodwood Festival of Speed is mouth-wateringly desirable, Michelin is looking like it may well steal the show when it comes to desirable metal this year.

And despite the Festival of Speed having a long and rich history celebrating the joys of the internal combustion engine, Michelin may well steal the show with an all-electric car.

After all electric cars need tyres too - and "speed" is the operative word in the festival's name - so along with the 1,340kW Dendrobium D-1 electric hypercar the company will also be hosting the global debut of the all-electric Mustang by Charge Cars.

Want a classic car look, but with cutting-edge tech? That'll be half a million dollars thank you sir.
Supplied
Want a classic car look, but with cutting-edge tech? That'll be half a million dollars thank you sir.

Built using Ford Mustang body shells to "preserve the iconic design in an emissions-free future", the Mustang will hit 100km/h in just under 4 seconds and can be switched from AWD to RWD for smoky burnout fun.

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Although with Charge's claim of 7,500Nm of torque at the wheels the Michelin's Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres fitted to the car won't last long in RWD mode...

There's lots of rubber on those rear tyres. But it won't last long with 7,500Nm of torque on tap.
Supplied
There's lots of rubber on those rear tyres. But it won't last long with 7,500Nm of torque on tap.

With a 64 kWh battery pack and a 300 kW electric motor, Charge says that the Mustang's range is only expected to be around 200 kilometres, partially due to the aerodynamic performance of an old muscle car design, but probably mainly due to skids.

With its retro-modern interior complete with a Tesla-style massive touchscreen, the Charge Mustang was first revealed last year, with the startup saying that it only planned to make 499 units which would cost £200,000 (NZ$378,000) each.

Since then the price has crept up though, with the Mustang being listed as starting at £300,000 (NZ$567,000) on the company's website. Still worth it.

Prato claims the Orage's 8.1-litre V8 is the most powerful naturally-aspirated production engine in the world.
Supplied
Prato claims the Orage's 8.1-litre V8 is the most powerful naturally-aspirated production engine in the world.

But petrol won't be ignored at the Michelin and along with the global launch of a new De Tomaso's supercar - dubbed 'Project P' and said to be a modern take on the legendary Pantera - the Michelin Supercar Paddock will house the monstrous Orage from French manufacturer Prato, which is making its dynamic debut up the hill across the Festival of Speed.

Prato claims the Orage (which means "thunderstorm" in french) packs the most powerful naturally-aspirated engine in a production car - a 670kW/1,044Nm 8.1-litre V8 - and will hit 100km/h in less than 3 seconds. It debuted at Le Mans last year and this will be the first time the limited-run (just 19 are being made) supercar will be seen in action.

The 2018 Michelin Supercar Showstopper of the Festival – the Apollo Intensa Emozione – will also be returning to the Paddock. A brutal, track-only hypercar, it packs a 596kW 6.3-litre V12 engine and wears a set of custom-made Michelin tyres to keep it stuck to the ground.

Elsewhere at the Festival, the Michelin Main Stand will play host to some of the most desirable and hotly-anticipated cars in the world, including the 1,200kW Koenigsegg Jesko and the Akula, a full carbon-construction supercar from British race experts Ginetta.

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