Winners and losers whichever road is built video

NZTA

New drone footage taken in October shows the impassable state of the Manawatū Gorge.

Ashhurst residents are keenly aware the selection of a new State Highway 3 route to replace the Manawatū Gorge road will create winners and losers among them. 

New Zealand Transport Association staff hosted an information day at the Village Valley Centre on Friday that drew a steady stream of residents from the town and surrounding areas to see details about the final four options for a new road.

They are an upgrade to the Saddle Rd, a new road north of the road, a new road south of it and a new road south of the Manawatū Gorge. All options through the gorge have been ruled out.

DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Three out of the four proposed routes will cut through Stuart Bolton's land.

The final choice is expected to be made by the end of the year, after consultation and assessments of the logistics involved in each. 

READ MORE: 
Manawatū Gorge shortlist of alternative routes revealed
Light at the end of long tunnel for Woodville 
Looking back at 145 years of the Manawatū gorge road
The final chapter in the Manawatū gorge's rocky history

SH3 through the gorge is closed indefinitely and dramatic drone footage released on Friday by the transport agency shows the extent to which the hillside had fallen on to the road.

Farmer Stuart Bolton's land near Ashhurst would be intersected by three of the four gorge alternative options. Right, ...
DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Farmer Stuart Bolton's land near Ashhurst would be intersected by three of the four gorge alternative options. Right, his son Camden Bolton, 9.

Farmer Stuart Bolton has set up his 102-hectare sheep and beef farm beside his father's 260ha farm. The three northern-most options on the table would all cut through both farms and cut Bolton's land off from the shared facilities he makes use of on the larger farm. 

However, he feels progress for the greater good is more important than individual landowners' concerns. He also knew the roading project was a possibility when he bought the land in 2002. That these routes were being seriously considered "didn't come as a surprise", he said. 

"If you sit up in the hills there, you can see it will probably go through here. The more I thought about it, the more it was the logical path to take." 

Discussion at an Ashhurst information day about the alternatives to the closed road through the Manawatū Gorge.
DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Discussion at an Ashhurst information day about the alternatives to the closed road through the Manawatū Gorge.

He is unsure what the family would do, but said subdivision was one possibility that could be considered, depending on details. 

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Ashhurst resident Richard Tankersley said: "If you ask how it's going to affect the community in the short term, to get a long-term solution – if that's four or five years away, that's significant for the community and those people directly affected by the current route and bypass."

He believes the route south of the gorge would suit the majority in the long term, because the gradient and relative straightness would help traffic flow and heavy vehicles.

Visitors at an Ashhurst information day read details about shortlisted routes that could replace the Manawatū Gorge road.
DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Visitors at an Ashhurst information day read details about shortlisted routes that could replace the Manawatū Gorge road.

However, he is also keenly aware it would cut through the property of close friends, and cause them distress and upheaval. 

The more consideration and consultation about helping those affected, the better the results will be for the community, he said. 

Karla Brighouse​ lives in the town and is worried about the effect of both the temporary diversion and the permanent route for residents. 

"It's not just the corridors. One of the bypasses is only about 100 metres from our street, but no-one's contacted us and today we still haven't got answers.

"Now, we've got lots of lovely birds and wildlife, and there could be an effect on our house value. If traffic is 24/7 and cuts through the [Ashhurst] Domain, it's affecting all the houses in our area."  

Her preferred option is also the route to the south of the gorge as it would protect Ashhurst's character, she said. 

Bob Sproull who farms further south, towards Aokautere, had been notified two of the options now off the table would have cut his farm in two.

He was happy the final four leave his land untouched, but said no matter what, his family would have worked out the best plan and "it wouldn't be the end of the world". 

As with many on the west side of the Ruahine Range, he believes the southernmost option would serve the majority best, even though it cuts through more high-grade farm land than the others, something he would have preferred to avoid. 

"It enhances the city because you get another bridge. It gives direct acess north and east and connects with the potential ring road round the city. That would all interconnect." 

With the addition of a new bypass at Bunnythorpe, he feels it gives the best north and south connection for traffic. 

 - Stuff

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