Author pens new children's book after recovering from a stroke

A year ago Robyn P Murray was recovering from a stroke which left her without the ability to talk or write. Now she's ...
EMILY FORD/STUFF

A year ago Robyn P Murray was recovering from a stroke which left her without the ability to talk or write. Now she's getting ready to release new children's books.

Children's author Robyn P Murray doesn't approach things with a negative mindset.

When she published her first children's book, Roger the Rooster of Ambury Park Farm, in 2012, she never thought it would fail. It went on to sell hundreds of copies, and is now available in Spanish and Braille.

And when the south Aucklander suffered a stroke last year, leaving her without the ability to walk, talk, or write, she knew she'd overcome that. One year on, she's releasing four new children's books.

Writing has always been a strong passion of Robyn P Murray's, so self-publishing her children's stories was a natural step.
EMILY FORD/STUFF

Writing has always been a strong passion of Robyn P Murray's, so self-publishing her children's stories was a natural step.

"I didn't imagine for one minute I wouldn't recover," Murray says.

Murray's stroke occurred in September 2016, affecting the left side of her brain and the right side of her body.

It took three months of regular therapy for her to regain things like hand movements, computer skills, and the ability to read out loud.

She's still recovering, getting tired easily and finding it easier to get out and about in the mornings.

It's her determination, mental attitude and love of writing that's kept her going, and she has no plans to give that up.

"It's important to have something that you have a passion for that gives you a reason for going on. My passion was my books."

Originally from Ireland, Murray's been a vicarious reader and writer since she was a child.

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It's been five years since she turned that passion into her career after a nudge from friends telling her to publish her stories.

Unless you were a celebrity chef or a rugby player, it was too hard to get picked up by a publisher, she says, so she went her own way.

"I knew if I didn't publish myself they never would get published."

While an expensive venture, she's glad she did, and now has an impressive catalogue of 17 books behind her, including two short-story collections.

She says aspiring authors should be aware that writing is a fulltime job and one you have to work hard at.

Murray says she's made mistakes along the way, but she always wants her books to be the best they can be.

"I love the process of sitting down at a typewriter and not knowing how the story is going to turn out."

Murray is launching her new children's books at this year's New Zealand Book Festival on November 11 at Mt Eden War Memorial Hall.

For more information go to the book festival's website.

 - Stuff

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