Nelson's 7010 cafes for sale as owner switches hot drinks for hemp

Claris Jones-White is selling her two central Nelson cafes to concentrate on her work in the hemp industry.
MARTIN DE RUYTER
Claris Jones-White is selling her two central Nelson cafes to concentrate on her work in the hemp industry.

Experimental fare is all well and good, but at the end of the day, sometimes people just want a latte and a cheese scone.

That's just one of many lessons Claris Jones-White has learned during four years of cafe ownership.

Jones-White opened her first 7010 Your Local Cafe on Collingwood St in 2015. A year ago, she opened a second cafe, 7010 2.0 on Bridge St.

Now, she's selling up, intending to boost her involvement in New Zealand's growing hemp industry. It's an area where believes she can really make her mark, working with growers and producers to develop and sell hemp products.

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As her interest in the sustainable crop has grown, the time she's been able to devote to her two eateries has diminished.

"I thought I could cut down on the time I'm [in the cafes] but I can't. The person who owns it needs to be in it. Every day the cafes are growing and growing, but because it's growing so well I can't manage both."

Never one to shy away from innovation, Jones-White has been ahead of the cafe curve, with plenty of innovative offerings on offer in her eateries.
Braden Fastier
Never one to shy away from innovation, Jones-White has been ahead of the cafe curve, with plenty of innovative offerings on offer in her eateries.

The business would work best run by a couple or a team of two, she said.

"It's really perfect for someone put their mark on it and breathe new life into it. With a little bit more investment you could expand: you could do sit down meals, apply for a liquor licence."

The last four years have been a steep learning curve, Jones-White said.

"I'm the queen of mistakes. Instead of taking a minute and thinking about it I react on the spot. If anyone wants to start a business come to me, and I'll tell you what not to do."

Always looking for new innovations, Jones-White would stay up late each night, researching ideas on the internet she could use in her business. Sometimes, the ideas would work, and sometimes, they wouldn't.

"You can go out of your way to make extraordinary things, and then you look at your sales at the end of the day and see the best sellers were a cheese scone and a latte, the real staples."

 

The Nelson Mail