Exploring the world of abstract art

Abstract artist Jane Trotter is one of two guest artists at this year's Fiordland Art Society's Labour weekend exhibition.
Barry Harcourt

Abstract artist Jane Trotter is one of two guest artists at this year's Fiordland Art Society's Labour weekend exhibition.

Turning everyday items into abstract images is something of an art form that Jane Trotter has perfected in the past 15 years.

Trotter, a Dunedin-based artist, along with Clyde metal sculptor Glenn Baty will be this year's guest artists at the Fiordland Art Society's annual Labour weekend multi-media art exhibition.

Trotter gets her inspiration from everyday objects and turns them into abstract photographs.

Two of her favourite pieces of works, that will be on display in Te Anau are First Contact and Tulip. 

The idea of Tulip came from two measuring cups sitting inside one another on her kitchen bench, while First Contact was an experiment photographing water and oil.

"My gut feeling would be that New Zealand is predominantly dominated by landscape imagery but certainly people are experimenting more, especially as photography becomes more easily accessible to people to use," Trotter said.

A piano teacher for more than 20 years, the abstract photography came about as she wanted another artistic avenue to complement her music. 

"Abstracted Reality" was her interpretation and transmutation of her immediate, domestic surroundings.  

The goal was to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary, Trotter said.

Society president Glenda Bell said the exhibition was now in its 36th year and a variety of works, in different art mediums, would be on display.

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People were inherently creative, Bell said, and what was most notable during the years, was the quality of art in the south was increasing.

The Labour weekend exhibition opens on October 20 and runs until October 23 at the Fiordland Community Events Centre in Te Anau.

 - Stuff

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