Former Black Caps batsman Peter Fulton waging a war against methamphetamine

Peter Fulton became just the fourth Kiwi to score tons in both innings of a test in 2013.
JOHN SELKIRK

Peter Fulton became just the fourth Kiwi to score tons in both innings of a test in 2013.

Ever wondered what former Black Caps batsman Peter Fulton is up to these days?

Well, among other things, chances are you'll find him scoping out Christchurch properties for traces of methamphetamine.

The 38-year-old pulled stumps on his lengthy cricket career in April, before setting up his business - CSI Drug Testing - a couple of months later.

Rising methamphetamine use in Christchurch has been blamed on young, male tradesmen.
JONATHAN CAMERON/STUFF

Rising methamphetamine use in Christchurch has been blamed on young, male tradesmen.

It's hands on stuff for the man known as "Two-metre Peter", who will juggle running his business with his new role as Christ's College cricket coach. 

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"I guess I was trying to look at things after cricket. Like any small business, you try and get involved in something that's got the potential to grow," Fulton said.

Former Black Cap Peter Fulton has started a meth testing business in Christchurch.
JOSEPH JOHNSON/STUFF

Former Black Cap Peter Fulton has started a meth testing business in Christchurch.

"Unfortunately, meth in New Zealand is a fairly hot topic at the moment and is a pretty big issue for a lot of people."

He's not wrong. 

New Zealand is in the midst of a meth epidemic, and earlier this year Massey University illicit drug researcher Chris Wilkins pointed the finger at an influx of young, male tradesmen for a surging demand in Christchurch. 

Peter Fulton helped Canterbury win the Plunket Shield earlier this year.
JOHN DAVIDSON/PHOTOSPORT

Peter Fulton helped Canterbury win the Plunket Shield earlier this year.

So it's perhaps no surprise Fulton's been busy since joining the fight against "P". 

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That means going into properties, testing for methamphetamine contamination, sending the samples to a laboratory and writing reports. 

His business doesn't do the de-contamination process, but will be sent back into treated properties to ensure no meth traces remain. 

Peter Fulton on his way to scoring the fastest domestic ton (50 balls) against Wellington in the Ford Trophy final in ...
JOHN DAVISON/PHOTOSPORT

Peter Fulton on his way to scoring the fastest domestic ton (50 balls) against Wellington in the Ford Trophy final in Rangiora last summer.

"It's pretty interesting, you see some interesting things," Fulton said.

"It's enjoyable working for myself. It's a little bit different to cricket. You've got no one telling you where to be, what time you've got to turn up and what you've got to wear. So that side of it's been really enjoyable.

"I had to do the training, go through the process of learning all about it. But I'm hands on and doing most of the stuff with regards to the business."

Fulton, who retired as Canterbury's first class leader in matches (121), runs (8719) and catches (128), is equally excited about his coaching gig at his former school. 

Christ's College's Stephen Dods, who is in charge of the cricket and rugby programmes at the school, originally pitched the coaching job to Fulton about 12 months ago. 

However, they had to put the idea on the backburner until Fulton's dodgy right-knee forced him to call time on his career, which also included 23 tests, 49 one-day internationals and 12 Twenty20 matches for New Zealand between 2004-14. 

Fulton has also been helping coach the New Zealand under-19 team ahead of next year's World Cup on home soil, but that doesn't mean full-time coaching is where he's headed. 

"I'm not 100 per cent sure if it's something I want to do fulltime yet. But I definitely want to stay involved and coach in some capacity," he said.

"I just haven't quite figured out if that's something I want to do fulltime or if these sort of opportunities appeal more in terms of coming in for a week here, a few days there or a month there."

 - Stuff

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