The silver linings of a White Ferns' world cup fail

New Zealand cricketer Debbie Hockley was and is the first female president on the NZC board.
Dean Kozanic

New Zealand cricketer Debbie Hockley was and is the first female president on the NZC board.

New Zealand Cricket have made progress in developing the women's game since releasing its Women and Cricket report one year ago.

Women's cricket in New Zealand suffered its biggest blow this year when the White Ferns bowed out early at the women's cricket world cup in July, however NZC public relations manager Richard Boock said since May 2016, the game had seen women in governance positions across the country rise from just 11 to 30.

Released in November, the Women and Cricket report's purpose was to tackle issues for female cricketers such as declining participation rates, inadequate talent pathways, insufficient development programmes for coaches, umpires and officials, and "a worrying lack of female representation" throughout the game at governance and management levels.

The White Ferns disappointed this year at the cricket world cup, but the women's game has made some positive ground in ...
BEN HOSKINS/GETTY IMAGESen Hoskins

The White Ferns disappointed this year at the cricket world cup, but the women's game has made some positive ground in the past year.

Boock said since the report's release, there had been positive movements in women's cricket and these included; governance, policy, networks and participation rates.

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"Ingrid Cronin-Knight has joined Liz Dawson on the board of New Zealand Cricket, and Debbie Hockley remains the first female president of New Zealand Cricket."

Boock said 50 per cent of New Zealand's six major association boards now had at least one female board member - a rise from two females to nine in major association governance since June last year.

There has been progress on the district association board as well, with 64 per cent now having at least one female board member - a 39 per cent increase.

NZC could not outline a financial investment into women's cricket in the last year or the different value put toward the women's game in comparison with the mens.

"It's very difficult to separate the costs of servicing and delivering women's cricket as opposed to men's – simply because these costs are often shared across both genders, as is the case with community cricket."

NZC had adopted an "inclusivity policy" which included policy on governance of the game. Other NZC measures NZC included the introduction of an induction day for females to cricket governance to encourage more women to have a say on how the game is run. 

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"Female directors in cricket have been connected via virtual networks and are actively engaging with and supporting each other."

The most pleasing aspect for NZC was the 12 per cent growth rate of girls cricket since last year.

When creating the Women and Cricket report, NZC found it would not be able to engage with women unless it made changes to include more women in management roles at all levels of the sport.

The percentage of women in national governance roles in cricket had dropped from 38 per cent to 14 per cent since the disestablishment of the New Zealand Women's Cricket Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 - Stuff

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