The changing face of the musical landscape as Taranaki library sells CDs

A potential buyer searches for a bargain at New Plymouth's Puke Ariki library.
GRANT MATTHEW/STUFF

A potential buyer searches for a bargain at New Plymouth's Puke Ariki library.

The changing sound of music was evident on Saturday as New Plymouth's Puke Ariki library sold its full CD collection.

On September 4 the library withdrew the CDs from being borrowed, having decided they were not getting enough use.

About 700 CDs were on sale on the library's ground floor on Saturday, with albums being sold for $2 each and a limit of five per person. There was everything from Coldplay and Mariah Carey to Mozart.

About 700 CDs were on sale at New Plymouth's Puke Ariki library.
STUFF

About 700 CDs were on sale at New Plymouth's Puke Ariki library.

Puke Ariki manager Kelvin Day said there was a mixed bag of titles.

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"As far as I know it's going well and it's pretty steady," he said.

New Plymouth's Puke Ariki library is selling its entire CD collection due to a downturn in borrowing.
CHRISTINA PERSICO/STUFF

New Plymouth's Puke Ariki library is selling its entire CD collection due to a downturn in borrowing.

The library made the decision to stop lending out CDs after the number of annual issues dropped from 2498 four years ago to 559 in 2016.

Day previously told Stuff it was a trend in libraries throughout the country.

"Most libraries in New Zealand don't have CD lending collections as people are now able to get their music in other ways online."

However, many libraries around the country still list a CD collection on their websites, including Auckland, Tauranga, Nelson, Dunedin and Christchurch.

Wellington Library does too, and still had around 51,000 CD issues a year. 

This was still "substantial", according to Chris Hay, the libraries and communities spaces manager at Wellington City Council.

But the issue rates were constantly under review, he said.

One New Plymouth library patron, who would give her name only as Cheryle, wasn't a fan of digital streaming.

"No, I like CDs better. You get to choose what you want to listen to," she said.

Another patron, Emma, said she never used CDs at home anymore and ddi not have a CD player in the house.

"I've just bought some for the car because I can't be bothered connecting my phone," she said.

"There's still something nicer about having CDs rather than having digital. I think for cars they still are good."

Andrea Willy said it was a tricky issue.

"I think it's sad for the artists that we don't listen to the whole CD anymore. Sometimes your favourite songs on an album aren't the ones they choose to release.

"But it is really convenient to just load songs on a playlist, at the same time."

 

 - Stuff

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