Medicinal cannabis group wants doctors to be able to prescribe products

Medical marijuana advocate Shane Le Brun wants GPs to be able to prescribe products directly to patients. (file photo)
Alden Williams/Fairfax NZ

Medical marijuana advocate Shane Le Brun wants GPs to be able to prescribe products directly to patients. (file photo)

Doctors should be allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis to patients in chronic pain throughout New Zealand, an advocacy group has said.

The call, from Medical Cannabis Awareness New Zealand, comes after Taranaki mother-of-one Helen Old this week gained approval to source medicinal cannabis (MC) products from Canada after a 12 month battle.

The 56-year-old, who has been battling multiple sclerosis, a disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord that has left her paralysed from the neck down, is one of only three people who have been given the green light to use different varieties of MC to treat pain.

Peter and Helen Old have just got approval to use medicinal cannabis products to help treat the pain Helen suffers with ...
SIMON O'CONNOR/STUFF

Peter and Helen Old have just got approval to use medicinal cannabis products to help treat the pain Helen suffers with from multiple sclerosis.

It took Old, and her husband Peter, more than nine months to get her application before the Ministry of Health which took another two months to approve it.

READ MORE
Taranaki woman wins 12-month fight to be given medicinal cannabis

Shane Le Brun, of Medical Cannabis Awareness New Zealand, said the process needed to be changed to benefit the tens of thousands high needs patients in New Zealand. 

The advocacy group aims to "Put Patients before Politics" and help others get access to MC in New Zealand through legal means.

"It wouldn't have taken nearly as long if the GP had the knowledge of cannabis based products and it was clearly communicated that GPs were able to prescribe them," Le Brun said​.

"What we'd propose is that for products that have been approved in other cases, GPs who have a demonstrated learning of cannabis can make the applications themselves."

He said the move would require a proactive, forward-thinking approach to the medicinal use of cannabis, with doctors being educated about the products from medical school.  

Le Brun said there had been a 100 per cent success rate getting Canadian products approved by the ministry and the country had a really good system which he would like to see New Zealand adopt.

He wanted to see the products made available as unregistered medicines and manufactured in New Zealand.

"We would get the best cost that we could get for the patients, and as unregistered medicines GPs could prescribe them and notify the Ministry of Health that they are using it and what they are using it for, as opposed to having to seek permission every time."

Le Brun said it was a multi-faceted issue but the group would keep working towards its goal.

"We want to keep pushing the boundaries on this non-pharmaceutical process to lower the cost of entry.

"We want to make products like Canada does and we want to do that in New Zealand."

The move would require an agency to be set up within the Ministry of Health to oversee cannabis cultivation and MCANZ was keeping a watch on who would be forming the next government.

The majority of new patients seeking MC didn't want to grow it, they just wanted safe, sterile and easy to use products, Le Brun said.

Peter Old said the couple had received an overwhelming amount of positive feedback, from people right around the world, since their story was published.

"It has been quite amazing.

"Everyone has been very supportive of the fact that people in pain that have been down the road of conventional pain relief, which doesn't work for them, should have the option of trying something that doesn't effect anybody else's life."

The couple are now working through the process of getting the approved products into New Zealand.

 - Stuff

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