Kiwis in flight: 7 incredible things to do in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia video

BROOK SABIN

From dining in a pitch black room full of strangers, to finding a theme park inside a shopping mall – Kiwis Brook Sabin and Radha Engling discover another side of Kuala Lumpur.

Trying on a pair of jeans, the mall began to rumble. The clothes rack even started shaking. There was distant screaming. Earthquake? Surely not in Kuala Lumpur.

No, it was a rollercoaster zipping through three levels of the mall.

It's one of seven incredible things we found exploring Malaysia's capital for a week. Here's what else you can't miss:

The Petronas Towers usually limit ticket sales to around 1000 a day, so it pays to book online in advance.
BROOK SABIN

The Petronas Towers usually limit ticket sales to around 1000 a day, so it pays to book online in advance.

1. Seriously good street food

There's one street in Kuala Lumpur that will give your taste buds a serious workout. It's called Jalan Alor, a street food paradise, where unctuous treats from all over Asia sizzle and steam as far as the eye can see.

Whether it's satay sticks, dumplings, or the traditional fried rice 'nasi goreng' – you will find thousands of different dishes you never knew existed. One stall owner was even behind a large blowtorch, enthusiastically using its huge flames to crisp up a table full of pig trotters!

The Hindu god of war and victory at the entrance of the Batu Caves.
BROOK SABIN

The Hindu god of war and victory at the entrance of the Batu Caves.

2. Petronas Towers

Kuala Lumpur's iconic twin towers are an incredible sight from the ground, but more so when you head up to the top.

From the 86th floor observation deck it feels like the world below is a lego set, apart from the other imposing twin tower that launches into the sky right next to you. A water fountain light show on the lake in front of the towers attracts thousands of people each night.

One of the many shrines inside the Batu Caves.
BROOK SABIN

One of the many shrines inside the Batu Caves.

3. Batu Caves

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These astonishingly large ancient caves – thought to be 400-million years old – sit just a 30-minute drive from the city centre, and are one of Malaysia's busiest attractions. It's also one of the most popular Hindu shrines outside India.

The entrance of the caves is also spectacular, with a 50-metre tall gold painted statue of Murugan, the Hindu god of war.

A buffet dinner up the KL Tower costs $75 per person.
BROOK SABIN

A buffet dinner up the KL Tower costs $75 per person.

To reach the first cave, you need to hydrate. It's 272 steps high, in 30c plus temperatures: a perfect storm for serious back sweat. 

But the climb is worth it: you'll first enter the Cathedral Cave, which is more than 100m high and has a large Hindu shrine, where candles and incense burn as people queue to pray.

The next cave is even more spectacular – it feels like you're inside a volcano with a huge circular hole high above you.

Being led into the 'dark room'.
BROOK SABIN

Being led into the 'dark room'.

4. Dinner with a view

Fancy a buffet in the clouds? The KL Tower is a little like Auckland's Sky Tower, although some 100m taller.

The buffet has a huge selection of Asian delights, and would be worth visiting even if it didn't have the best view in town. The fact it does, means you can't miss it.

The roller coaster at Berjaya Times Square comes within centimetres of shoppers at the mall.
BROOK SABIN

The roller coaster at Berjaya Times Square comes within centimetres of shoppers at the mall.

5. The ultimate blind date

One of the best food experiences in Kuala Lumpur is a four-course dinner in a pitch black room – and you have no idea what you're putting in your mouth.

To enter 'Dining in the Dark' you put your hand on the shoulders of your waiter at the entrance to the 'dark room' and with incredible precision, you'll be led to your chair.

The waiters are all visually impaired, and have the floorplan mapped in their head. They use the odd clap or click of the fingers to make sure they don't bump into each other.

You really can't see a thing, meaning the plates need to be brought right up to your mouth to ensure it all goes in – but don't worry if you spill something, nobody will know!

Part of the fun is guessing what you're eating, and the chefs deliberately play with your mind by changing textures and tastes. Sweet corn ice cream anyone?

The texture of chocolate is almost worth the trip to Malaysia alone.
BROOK SABIN

The texture of chocolate is almost worth the trip to Malaysia alone.

6. The coolest mall on Earth

Your local Westfield mall will never been the same after seeing a rollercoaster, complete with a loop, weave through the heart of a 10-storey mall.

Berjaya Times Square has 13 rides as part of the theme park, which will keep the kids entertained for hours - just as well because there's more than 1000 shops in the mall.

7. Taste chocolate like never before

You'll no doubt burn some serious calories walking around 1000 shops - which means you deserve chocolate.

The best chocolate dish in Kuala Lumpur is arguably the 'texture of chocolate' at Skillet @163.

It's a milk chocolate sphere filled with white chocolate 'rocks' which pop like a volcano when dry ice is poured over them.

Once the dessert is frozen, you smash it open with a hammer and then warm it all back up by smothering it with a jug full of warm, melted chocolate.

Last year Brook Sabin and his partner Radha Engling quit their jobs and sold everything to travel. They started a blog onflightmode.com and now call themselves fulltime travellers, making a living selling travel photos and video all around the world. Each week Kiwis in Flight will take you on their adventures.

 - Stuff

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