No, Nasa is not hiding a colony of child slaves on Mars video

The situation for human beings on Mars is dire, and not just because the red planet's atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide and the average temperature is - 62 degrees Celsius.

There's also the issue of the child-trafficking ring operating in secret on the planet 54.5 million kilometers from earth, according to a guest on US national radio programme. 

"We actually believe that there is a colony on Mars that is populated by children who were kidnapped and sent into space on a 20-year ride," Robert David Steele said Thursday during a winding, conspiratorial dialogue on the Alex Jones Show about child victims of sex crimes.

There are absolutely no humans on Mars. None at all.
NASA

There are absolutely no humans on Mars. None at all.

"So that once they get to Mars they have no alternative but to be slaves on the Mars colony."

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Nasa did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Nasa's Curiosity Rover is on Mars, but there are definitely no children there.
NASA

Nasa's Curiosity Rover is on Mars, but there are definitely no children there.

But Guy Webster, a spokesman for Mars exploration at Nasa, told the Daily Beast that rumours about live humans on Mars were false.

"There are no humans on Mars," he said. "There are active rovers on Mars. There was a rumour going around last week that there weren't. There are, but there are no humans."

Jones is known for peddling elaborate and debunked conspiracy theories on his radio show, which airs on 118 stations around the US and reaches millions of listeners. The site had 4.5 million unique page views in the past month and more than 5 million from mid-April to mid-May, according to Quantcast. His YouTube channel has more than 2 million subscribers.

Among his most well-known accusations in recent years is that the December 2012 Sandy Hook massacre, in which 20 children and six adults were killed at a school in Newtown, Connecticut, was a hoax. Jones has claimed that the US government orchestrated the September 11, 2001, attacks and, more recently, promoted the "Pizzagate" conspiracy, which alleged that Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign was linked to a child-sex ring operating from the basement of a suburban Washington DC pizzeria.

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The theory originated on Reddit, where a user claimed hacked emails belonging to Clinton campaign manager John Podesta revealed evidence of an international child-sex ring. The key, the user alleged, was replacing the word "pizza" with "little boy".

From that moment, the conspiracy theory took on a life of its own, culminating in a North Carolina man firing a military-style assault rifle inside the restaurant in December. Edgar Maddison Welch told investigators he was there to save abused children. Instead, he pleaded guilty to federal weapons charges in March and was sentenced to four years in prison last month.

Confronted about his Sandy Hook allegations during a controversial interview with NBC's Megyn Kelly last month, Jones hedged.

"I tend to believe that children probably did die there," he told the anchor. "But then you look at all the other evidence on the other side. I can see how other people believe that nobody died there."

On Thursday's Infowars broadcast, Steele appeared to connect the kidnapped children being held captive on Mars to paedophile rings who allegedly use children for their youthful body parts and energy.

"Pedophilia does not stop with sodomising children," Steele said. "It goes straight into terrorising them to adrenalise their blood and then murdering them. It also includes murdering them so that they can have their bone marrow harvested as well as body parts."

"This is the original growth hormone," Jones said.

"Yes, it's an anti-aging thing," Steele replied.

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 - The Washington Post

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